Course Syllabus

Syllabus French 1B

University of Missouri High School

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Welcome

We are pleased that you selected this course to fulfill your unique educational needs. You are now a member of the Mizzou K-12's global student body.

Although the freedom to choose when and where to study is a privilege, it is also a responsibility that requires motivation and self-discipline. To succeed at learning, you will need to develop a study plan by setting realistic goals and working toward them. 

This global course is designed through the individual sections to assist in your pacing. 

Course Overview

Mizzou K-12 has partnered with Rosetta Stone Education to offer this competency-based, interactive language learning course. Students will develop conversational speaking skills, build listening and comprehension skills through significant exposure and practice with native speakers*, and will acquire reading and writing skills in their new language.   

Our online immersive language learning software supports the student in applying their language skills through lessons, interactive games, and live studio sessions with native speakers*.

(*Note: Live Studio sessions are only available for English, Spanish, Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, German, French, and Italian.) 

Demo

Are you not yet enrolled and you are curious about the world language course?

Want to know what it looks like before you register?

View an interactive demo here. 

(Select your language, Start the demo. Use "truman@example.com" as the email. When the window opens, select "Skip to Interactive".)

Course Description

Upon completion of this world language course, learners will continue mastering basic interactions with people, places, and things in their new language environment.

They will be able to ask for directions to common urban landmarks and to inquire about or describe the identity, cost, quantity, and basic physical characteristics (e.g., color, size) of various items. Learners will be able to begin discuss their own situation (past, present, and future) in the context of a larger and more complex language landscape. They will be more confident in both giving and receiving directions to various destinations around and outside of town. Students will be able to begin discussing travel itineraries, asking directions and following directions, weather, ask for clarification, and making polite requests. In this course, students are required to have live studio sessions with a native speaker.

Course Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to apply new language knowledge in real-life situations through the following:

  • Shopping
  • Names of several stores
  • Things commonly bought
  • Verbs about places and objects
  • Express likes and dislikes
  • Compare things
  • Things to do around town
  • Sports
  • Cost of items
  • Common currencies
  • Common shopping phrases
  • Different forms of payment
  • Describing objects one shops for
  • Comparatives
  • Quantity
  • Comparison words
  • Shopping
  • Types of buildings
  • Types of stores
  • Asking for directions
  • Following directions
  • Public transportation
  • Directional language
  • Vehicles
  • Verbs used with modes of transportation
  • Various kinds of transportation stations
  • Travel itineraries
  • Specific time words
  • Additional modes of transportation
  • Higher Numbers
  • Useful vocabulary for airports and train stations
  • Travel destinations
  • Weather language
  • Temperature
  • Kinds of precipitation
  • Talking about the weather in the future
  • Past tense
  • Indirect objects
  • Correspondence
  • Future tense
  • Indirect objects
  • Asking for clarification
  • School subjects
  • Imperfect tense
  • Different levels of school and students
  • Jobs and workplaces
  • Contrast between past tense and imperfect tense
  • Polite ways to make requests
  • Compound sentences
  • Need and want
  • Possessive pronouns
  • Forming questions
  • The stative passive
  • Comparison
  • Category
  • Aspect
  • Sameness
  • Difference
  • Prepositions
  • Pronoun contractions
  • The imperative

Required Materials

There are no required materials for this course. However, please view the hardware and technical requirements for the course.

Learning Training Level

See the below image to verify the level at which you should begin.  

LanguageLevels_pacing.png

More detailed information can be found in your pacing chart.

Canvas and Technical Support

Canvas is the where course content, grades, and communication will reside for this course.

Technical Requirements

  This course is mobile-friendly.   

CanVas Requirements

The most up-to-date system requirements for Canvas can be found here: 

Additional Requirements for World Language Courses

Purchase the Microsoft LifeChat Headset

Test Bandwidth and Latency Here

Download Rosetta Stone Learn Languages Mobile App(s)

Info: IMPORTANT!

Milestone activities (which occur once per unit) and Writing activities (which occur once per lesson) cannot be completed on mobile devices. You will need brief access to a computer for these milestone activities. All other activities may be fully completed on your mobile device; your data will sync between devices automatically. 

Grades

Given that this is a competency-based program, the grading is slightly different than what you might encounter in other courses. The grades are provided in two areas: pacing and performance

Your final grade will be based on the number of points you earn on two assignments: pacing and performance. 

Course Grade

Course Grade

For students who meet the above criteria, the student's course grade is determined by weighting the pacing grade (25%) and the performance grade (65%), and Games and Activities (10%).  

Source for Grade Weight
Total 100%
Performance 65%
Pacing 25%
Games and Activities 10%

Grading Scale

Grading Scale

Mizzou K-12 uses the following grading scale for students who meet this criteria:

Grade Percentage
Grading Scale
A 90–100
B 80–89
C 70–79
D 60–69
F 0–59

After completing the course, you will receive a grade report that gives course percentage and a letter grade for the course.

Upon completing all requirements, pacing and performance grades will be entered into Canvas and the student will be completed. Please contact our world language coordinator for any questions or concerns about grades.

Performance (65%)

About Performance

Performance is your overall score, or your cumulative performance within the course. When you generate a report, your overall performance score is at the top. If you have taken more than one course in the same language with us through Rosetta Stone, be sure to filter the dates to show only the current course in order to get an accurate reflection of total performance. 

You can keep track of his or her performance score throughout each activity and can check on the overall score at any time. In addition, you can redo until satisfactory mastery is achieved:

Bar showing 75% mastery on writing, highlighted to show a student can choose to redo this for a higher performance score.

Above: 75% Performance in writing can be improved at any time

Performance Grade (65%)

Below is an image of a report generated which shows the overall performance score. Students and Mizzou K-12 can both generate reports. Parents and counselors will need to ask students or Mizzou K-12 to generate a report for them.

performance grade is shown at the top of the reports you can generate from Rosetta Stone

Above Example: The student above, if completed, would receive a 97% for the performance grade.

The overall score for the course's units will be placed into Canvas as the performance grade when the student is completed with all requirements (such as Live Studio Sessions and Games and Activities requirements; see below.)

Pacing (25%)

About Pacing

Pacing is the progress you are making throughout the time you are enrolled in the course. In other words, it is how fast or slow you go through the course. You don't want to speed through the course, but you also don't want to put everything off towards the end. This is the reason why we give you a Pacing Grade. We want you to make steady progress. 

To encourage you to make steady progress throughout the course, a pacing guide is provided to you in the Course Introduction and Resources module. Use the Pacing Guide to plan out your course. Check Tiger Portal to view your exact start date. 

Above: Sample pacing guide for your first orientation week.

Your pacing guide will walk you through what to do each week in the areas of performance (lessons), pacing (when to do them), games and activities, live studio (tutoring) sessions, and real-world application weeks. You will always know where you should be and what you should be doing week by week!

We recommend and pace you for a 16-week curriculum

In order to earn full credit for your pacing grade (100%), you must complete all requirements within 20 weeks of your start date. (This is 16 weeks plus 4 extra weeks.) 

You are allowed up to 26 weeks to completely finish the course. (Though if you took 26 weeks, you would not be able to receive full points for pacing.)

Pacing Grade (25%)

Your pacing grade has 100 points possible and accounts for 25% of your overall course grade. Your pacing grade equates to the percentage of the way you are through the curriculum by week 20. This grade will be given either when you complete the course or at the end of 20 weeks (whichever comes first). If you complete all requirements by week 20 (from your starting date), your pacing grade will be 100/100, or 100%.

If you do not complete all requirements by week 20, on week 20 your pacing grade will be calculated at 20 weeks and entered into Canvas. Your pacing grade will be determined using the following formula:

 \(\frac{actual\:progress}{progress\:you\:should\:have\:attained}=Pacing\:Grade\:\%\)

View the pacing grade tables below. 

A Courses – Pacing Grade at week 20 (if not complete)
Unit Last lesson entirely completed on Week 20 Pacing Grade

Not complete with Lesson 1 yet or not started

0%

First Unit

Lesson 1

5%

First Unit

Lesson 2

10%

First Unit

Lesson 3

20%

First Unit

Lesson 4 and Milestone

35%

Second Unit

Lesson 1

40%

Second Unit

Lesson 2

45%

Second Unit

Lesson 3

50%

Second Unit

Lesson 4 and Milestone

65%

Third Unit

Lesson 1

70%

Third Unit

Lesson 2

75%

Third Unit

Lesson 3

85%

Third Unit

Lesson 4 and Milestone

100%

B Courses – Pacing Grade at week 20 (if not complete)
Unit Last lesson entirely completed on Week 20 Pacing Grade

Not complete with Lesson 1 yet or not started

0%

Review Unit

Lesson 1

Not applicable

Review Unit

Lesson 2

Not applicable

Review Unit

Lesson 3

Not applicable

Review Unit

Lesson 4 and Milestone

Not applicable

Second Unit

Lesson 1

40%

Second Unit

Lesson 2

45%

Second Unit

Lesson 3

50%

Second Unit

Lesson 4 and Milestone

65%

Third Unit

Lesson 1

70%

Third Unit

Lesson 2

75%

Third Unit

Lesson 3

85%

Third Unit

Lesson 4 and Milestone

100%

Example: A student taking Spanish 1A (an "A" course) was not yet complete with the course at 20 weeks. The student had completed everything through the third unit, lesson 3. The student received 85% for his pacing grade.

Games and Activities (10%)

About Games and Activities

It is required that you spend a minimum of 12 cumulative (total) hours in games and activities. Recommendations are provided in the pacing guides, and cumulative times can be seen in reports. 

Games and activities help the student to generalize your target language and use it in a new and fun environment. 

Games and Activities Grade (10%)

Games and Activities Grade is worth 10%. It is either "complete" (1 point) or "not complete" (0 points). This grade will be given to you either when you complete the course requirements or on week 20 (whichever comes first).

You must meet the minimum of 12 hours of games and activities by the time you complete your course (your units and lessons). If you do not meet the minimum requirements, no matter the hours completed, you receive an incomplete in Games and Activities.

As such, it is important to follow the recommendations in the pacing guide each week.

Example 1: A student was complete with all requirements at 15 weeks. Her games and activities cumulative time for this course was 15 hours. She received a "complete", or 1/1, for her Games and Activities grade. 

Example 2: A student was complete with all requirements at 19 weeks. Her games and activities cumulative time for the course was 6 hours. She received an "incomplete", or 0/1, for her Games and Activities grade.

Requirement: Live Studio (Tutoring) Sessions

Requirement: Live Studio Sessions

From Rosetta Stone:

"Rosetta Stone Live Studio (also called "Live Tutoring") is an immersive environment where you practice your new language in real time in a small-group setting. Your sessions are guided by a Live Tutor who is a native speaker of your new language. During your Live Tutoring sessions, you'll speak and interact with other learners in activities designed to help you practice what you just learned in Language Training.

"During the session, you see your Live Tutor and the names of the other learners who are attending, but no one is able to see you. You will communicate with your Live Tutor and other learners through your microphone headset." (see resource)

These Live Studio (Tutoring) Sessions are  a required part of the course. You should attend one studio session per unit. We recommend you complete their live studio session prior to your milestone activity. You can schedule your live studio sessions during any open times. This information on how to schedule live studio sessions are available in the course. 

In order to pass the course, you must attend a minimum of 2 studio (tutoring) sessions. You are allowed to attend a maximum of four sessions (without prior approval). If you do not attend a minimum of two studio sessions within their semester, you are not allowed to complete or pass the course. Accommodations or adjustments to this requirement must be approved in advance by the Director of Academic Affairs.

Assignments

All language learning work will be within the online immersive language learning environment. There is nothing graded to submit within Canvas. (There are a few practice quizzes in the introductory module before you begin.) If you are experiencing difficulty, reach out to the Mizzou K-12 world language coordinator

Real-World Week

Real-World Week

There are three "real-world" weeks listed in your pacing guide. These are opportunities for you to take your language and apply it in the world around you. Specifics will be given in your introductory module.

Learning tips and best practices

We want to help you get the most out of the world language course so that you can reach your language goals. Below you can find some language-learning tips and best practices to help ensure that you’re making the most of your experience.

  • Don’t forget to use a USB headset. Having the correct headset and microphone means a better audio experience in your course.
  • Practice a little bit every day to keep everything you’re learning fresh in your mind! Just like learning anything new, the more often you practice, the more you will remember what you've learned.
  • Schedule practice time on your calendar. Doing this will help remind you to practice your language studies each day.
  • Find a language partner to practice with.  Learn and practice your new vocabulary together.
  • Immerse yourself in your new language. Look for opportunities to practice your language skills outside of the program. This could be watching TV shows and movies, or playing games in your new language.
  • Use the Language mobile applications. Easy access from your phone or tablet allows for a more dynamic learning experience. 
  • Review learning expectations with your teacher. Make sure that you fully understand all usage requirements for learning with Rosetta Stone. This will set you up for success as you move towards your goal of learning a new language!

Mizzou K-12 Policies Policies

Academic Integrity

Our academic integrity policy at Mizzou K-12 is based on our values of ethical behavior, learning, and giving all stakeholders the benefit of the doubt. Collaboration, research, and technical literacy are vital 21st-century skills when combined with academic integrity. 

Definitions

Mizzou K-12’s academic integrity policy is aligned with the University of Missouri’s academic integrity policy. The definitions of what constitutes "cheating" and "plagiarism"are posted on the Provost’s Advising Council’s webpage which can be found here: https://advising.missouri.edu/policies/academic-integrity

Issues Involving Violations of Academic Integrity

If, when completing any of your assignments or exams for this course, you are found to have demonstrated cheating or plagiarism as defined above, this is a violation of academic integrity. At your teacher's discretion, violations of academic integrity may be subject to either or both of the following actions: 

  • receiving a zero for the assignment or exam
  • receiving an F for the course

Accessibility

If you anticipate barriers related to the format or requirements of this course, please let Mizzou K-12 know as soon as possible. If disability-related accommodations are necessary (for example, a scribe, reader, extended time on exams, captioning), please contact Mizzou K-12.

Additional Course Policies and links

**Not applicable to World Language courses.

Course Summary:

Date Details