Course Syllabus

AP European History, First Semester

UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI HIGH SCHOOL

Welcome

We are pleased that you selected this course to fulfill your unique educational needs. You are now a member of the Mizzou Academy's global student body.

Course Overview

This is an 18 week online course composed of an orientation week and 17 weekly sessions. Expect to invest about 9-15 hours a week on course activities and assignments.

Students will study European History beginning around 1450. The course introduces students to cultural, economic, political, and social developments that played a fundamental role in shaping the modern world in which they live. Without this knowledge, we would lack the context for understanding the development of contemporary institutions, the role of conflict and continuity in present-day society and politics, and the evolution of current forms of artistic expression and intellectual discourse. Another course goal is for students to understand some of the principal themes in modern European history, to analyze historical evidence, and to express historical understanding in writing.

Most AP courses consist of 2 semesters and you should complete semester 1 before starting semester 2. AP exams are offered early in May.

NOTE: If you enroll after the start date in an AP course, it is important that you adjust the pacing chart accordingly so you can complete your course before the scheduled AP exam dates or use this link to find more information about Advanced Placement and to see the AP Exam Calendar.

Prerequisites

None.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

At the end of each of the lesson, students should be able to: 

Lesson 1

  1. List and explain the factors that led to the Age of Exploration.
  2. Discuss how the Mongols affected trade along the Silk Road.
  3. Explain why slaves were so important to the Ottoman Empire and how the Ottoman Empire's existence prompted the Age of Exploration.
  4. Describe how the Portuguese came to control trade with the Far East in the fourteenth century.
  5. Explain how the influx of New World silver affected the economy of Europe.
  6. Define various terms pertaining to the fifteenth century and the Age of Exploration.
  7. Identify and explain the significance of the major historical figures (people) and events of the Age of Exploration as well as its chief literary and artistic achievements.

Lesson 2

  1. Explain how the historical period known as the Renaissance differs from the preceding Middle Ages.
  2. Explain why the Renaissance began in Italy and not in some other place.
  3. Describe the distinguishing features of Italian Renaissance painting, sculpture, and architecture.
  4. Explain why the Renaissance declined in Italy.
  5. Identify and explain distinctive features of the northern Renaissance.
  6. Define various terms pertaining to the Renaissance.
  7. Identify and explain the significance of the major historical figures (people) and events of the Renaissance as well as consequential literary and artistic achievements.

Lesson 3

  1. Identify and explain the significant causes of the Protestant Reformation.
  2. Explain the rapid spread of Protestantism throughout much of Europe.
  3. Explain how Reformation ideas affected accepted notions of the family and marriage.
  4. Explain the intent and evaluate the overall success of the Catholic Reformation.
  5. Explain the lasting significance of the Protestant Reformation.
  6. Define various terms pertaining to the Protestant and Catholic Reformations.
  7. Identify and explain the significance of the major historical figures (people) and events of the Reformation as well as consequential literary and artistic achievements.

Lesson 4

  1. Identify and explain the economic, religious, and political dilemmas that led to Europe's century of religious wars, sometimes referred to as Europe's "iron century".
  2. Describe the major and minor religious wars that shook Europe from 1540 to 1660 and analyze to what extent they were religious in nature.
  3. Discuss the effects of the century of religious wars upon European thought, in particular the notions of skepticism and authority.
  4. Define various terms pertaining to the century of religious wars.
  5. Identify and explain the significance of the major historical figures (people) and events of the years from 1540 to 1660 as well as consequential literary and artistic achievements.

Lesson 5

  1. Identify and explain the causes and effects of the rapid increase in population that occurred in the era from roughly 1600 to 1800.
  2. Identify and explain the reasons for changes in both agricultural and industrial means of production during the same period.
  3. Describe the distinguishing features and explain the effects of the so-called commercial revolution.
  4. Explain the significance in the rise of European colonization and overseas trade during the period from 1600 to 1800.
  5. Describe how economic changes during this period began to affect Europe's social order.
  6. Define various terms pertaining to the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.
  7. Identify and explain the significance of the major historical figures (people) and events of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries as well as consequential literary and artistic achievements.

Lesson 6

  1. Explain the appeal of absolutism and how European rulers justified it.
  2. Compare and contrast eastern and central European notions of absolutist rulers with those of their western counterparts.
  3. Describe the distinguishing features and effects of autocracy within Russia.
  4. Explain what is meant by a European "state" system and how its emergence affected international diplomacy.
  5. Explain how warfare changed during the Age of Absolutism.
  6. Define various terms pertaining to the Age of Absolutism.
  7. Identify and explain the significance of the major historical figures (people) and events of the Age of Absolutism as well as consequential literary and artistic achievements.

Lesson 7

  1. Identify the intellectual roots of the scientific revolution.
  2. Identify the discoveries that led to a revolution in astronomy and explain how this knowledge affected everyday thinking and religion.
  3. Describe the new philosophies that arose parallel to advances in knowledge of the heavens.
  4. Explain the significance of the development of the scientific method.
  5. Identify and explain distinctive features of the scientific revolution.
  6. Define various terms pertaining to the scientific revolution.
  7. Identify and explain the significance of the major historical figures (people) and events of the scientific revolution as well as consequential literary and artistic achievements.

Lesson 8

  1. Identify the intellectual roots of the Enlightenment.
  2. Describe the culture of the French philosophers.
  3. Describe how Enlightenment ideas achieved international attention.
  4. Discuss the reaction of European autocrats to Enlightenment ideas.
  5. Explain how the Enlightenment affected contemporary European culture.
  6. Identify and explain distinctive features of the Enlightenment.
  7. Define various terms pertaining to the Enlightenment.
  8. Identify and explain the significance of the major historical figures (people) and events of the Enlightenment as well as consequential literary and artistic achievements.

Lesson 9

  1. Identify the roots of the French Revolution.
  2. Explain how the revolution came to be a popular movement.
  3. Explain the origins and significance of the radical phase of the French Revolution.
  4. Discuss the rise of Napoleon and imperial France and how, ultimately, Bonaparte's bid for power was crushed.
  5. Identify and explain distinctive features of the French Revolution.
  6. Define various terms pertaining to the French Revolution.
  7. Identify and explain the significance of the major historical figures (people) and events the French Revolution as well as consequential literary and artistic achievements. 

Lesson 10

  1. Explain the factors that led to the Industrial Revolution in Britain.
  2. Explain the process whereby the Industrial Revolution took hold in Continental Europe.
  3. Explain the significance of the coming of the railways to Europe and the world at large.
  4. Identify how the Industrial Revolution had begun to evolve by the mid-nineteenth century.
  5. Explain how the Industrial Revolution led to the rise of European empires overseas.
  6. Identify and explain distinctive features of the Industrial Revolution.
  7. Define various terms pertaining to the Industrial Revolution.

Required Materials

  • Western Civilizations, 17th Edition, Volume 2. Judith Coffin and Robert Stacey. W. W. Norton & Company, 2011.

Quizzes & Assignments

You should submit all assigned work in sequence (Lesson 1, then Lesson 2, etc.) Assignments for the course are listed at the bottom of this syllabus.

Most Mizzou Academy courses include graded quizzes, submitted assignments, online discussions, or a combination of these elements.

You may use any assigned readings, your notes, and other course-related materials to complete your graded quizzes, submitted work, and/or online discussions. The points you earn on your submitted work will count toward your final course grade. Be sure to check your work carefully for errors (e.g. spelling, grammar, and punctuation) as errors may result in points being deducted.

Each lesson provides step-by-step instructions on how to submit your work.

Quizzes

All quizzes for Mizzou Academy Online / MU High School courses are taken online. After you submit them, you’ll quickly receive a report on how you did.

You will complete 5 multiple-choice quizzes. The assignments for Lessons 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 are quizzes consisting of multiple-choice questions worth 1 point each. You will receive instantaneous feedback on these evaluations.

NOTE: The graded quizzes cannot be retaken because you will receive immediate feedback for all items you’ve missed.

Assignments

Assignments may consist of written work (essays, compositions, etc.), collaborative wiki projects, journal entries, audio or video recordings, multimedia presentations, graphics, etc. Each assignment will list the instructions for completing that assignment. Assignments may require you to submit your completed work in the form of a file (such as a text document, image, audio or video recording, or multimedia presentation) or a hyperlink for grading. See your Helpful Resources section of your course for tutorials.

The assignments for Lessons 2, 4, 6, and 8 will be submitted to your instructor for grading. They are each worth 10 points and consist of two parts. Part A is worth 6 points. It consists of 6 short-answer identification questions and you must choose 3 to answer. Each answer is worth 2 points. Part B consists of two short-answer questions worth 2 points.

Canvas automatically allows students to resubmit assignments. However, students should not resubmit assignments without prior instructor approval.

Discussion Boards

Participation in online discussion boards is expected and will factor into your overall course grade.

All online discussions described in course lesson pages are required unless your instructor notes otherwise. Your instructor may also arrange additional required chats or instructor conferences. Be sure to regularly check the course calendar and announcements from your instructor regarding upcoming discussions and requirements.

Your participation in required online discussions will be evaluated on criteria such as frequency, timeliness, thoughtfulness and effort, and overall contribution to the knowledge base and learning experience of your classmates. You are also expected to monitor and respond to posts on discussion threads which you have started or have previously contributed to; you should not simply make a post and consider the discussion “done,” because it should be an ongoing conversation with your peers and/or instructor.

Postings that begin new discussion forum threads will be reviewed based on their relevance, demonstrated understanding of course concepts, examples cited, and overall quality. Postings that respond to other students’ posts will be evaluated based on relevance, degree to which they extend discussions, and tone.

The discussion forums provide in-depth opportunities for class discussion and guided activities for practice and review. There are 4 discussion board assignments in this course; they take place during Lessons 1, 3, 7, and 9. Each discussion is worth 9 points.

In order to earn full credit for the discussion, you must (a) respond to the provided prompt and (b) post a relevant comment to at least two of your classmates' posts. The latter may entail asking a question or comparing and/or contrasting your classmates' posts with your own. In order to earn full credit for discussion forum participation, your posts and responses must be substantive; in other words, you will not earn credit for just replying "Good post" or "I agree" to a classmate.

Reading and Using Feedback

After your work has been graded, you will receive a report that provides individualized feedback and comments on your work. Look carefully at what you missed and read any corresponding feedback. Then study the lesson materials to make certain that you can accomplish the associated learning objectives.

Each lesson provides step-by-step instructions on how to submit your work. Be sure to check submitted work carefully for errors (e.g. spelling, grammar, and punctuation) as they may result in points being deducted.

Grades

Your final grade will be based on the number of points you earn on assignments and exams.

The following grading scale applies only to students who meet this standard:

Grading Scale
Grade Percentage
A 90–100
B 80–89
C 70–79
D 60–69
F 0–59

After completing the course, unofficial transcripts will be available in the Tiger Portal. See this page for information on requesting official transcripts. 

Exams

You are required to take two proctored exams for this course.

See the "About Exams" in the policies section for additional information on exams at Mizzou Academy.

AP Exam

When you register for the AP exam, please use the Mizzou Academy/University of MO High School provider code: 041. If you have any questions, please let your AP instructor or our AP Coordinator, Alicia Bixby know. Ms. Bixby’s email is bixbya@missouri.edu. 

AP - Discussions and Chats

The chat room is intended to create a more interactive classroom atmosphere. These are usually student-driven. I will take questions over the lesson, examples, or suggested problems from the textbook. Together we will work through these questions and clarify lesson topics. To earn chat points, you must ask or answer at least 2 questions during the course of the chat. You should attend each chat as you would a regular classroom, having read the material and prepared to participate in a discussion of the ideas covered in the lesson.

There will also be an introductory chat offered during the first week of the course. Attendance does not count toward your required chat attendance. However, you are strongly encouraged to attend as this provides you with an opportunity to meet your instructor and classmates and to become familiar with the chat format.

In order to keep the chats manageable and effective for everyone, I ask that you sign up for the chat by the Friday before each chat. Space in the sessions is limited, so contact your instructor to sign up as soon as possible. The introductory chat is the only one for which you are not required to register before attending. If the chat is full, the instructor will contact you via e-mail.

Homework Discussion Forum

The homework forum is designed for you to ask your classmates and instructor questions in a timely manner. This gives everyone the opportunity to not only ask their own questions, but also to share their understanding with those in need. Each lesson has a homework forum, and you can receive 10 points per lesson (not per post) for posting. To receive participation points, your post(s) must be made within 1 week of the due date for that lesson’s progress evaluation. This is designed to be more of an ongoing conversation and a way to connect to others between chats. Space on these is unlimited, making it a great way to earn online participation points. I will monitor the forum and step in when necessary, but my goal is you to take control of these conversations and make it fit your needs.

AP - Late Work and Absences

Work must be turned in on time for full credit. If you are unable to complete an assignment on time, contact your instructor immediately. Prior permission from the online course instructor must be obained for special circumstances to receive credit for late work. These decisions will be made on an individual basis.

You must notify your instructor if you expect to be offline for more than 1 week.

AP - Exam Prep Through LearningExpress Library

In the next section, you will find "Getting Started Resources." Within the Library Material is LearningExpress Library, which contains AP practice exams and study material, in addition to what is on the AP website. 

Below we are providing you with a direct link to the College Prep Center of the LearningExpress Library. You can only launch it through this link. When you arrive, you should see "Mizzou K-12" on the left-hand side, showing that you are with our institution. You will want to create an account in order to save any work or test prep you do.  

Once you click the link below, select "Prepare for your AP Exam". Please create a help ticket (Help -> Report a problem) if you cannot find what you are looking for.

EBSCOhost

Technical Requirements

The most up-to-date requirements can be found here: 

Additional requirements for the course are below: 

  • This course does not require anything beyond the minimum requirements.

Credit

Course created by Mizzou Academy Online.

About the Course Developer

Scott Henderson received his BA in English literature from the University of Missouri in 1995 and his MA in classical languages in 1999. He currently teaches Latin and Advanced Placement European History at the Columbia Independent School and is in the process of completing his PhD in classical studies. This is the sixth course he has written for MU High School.

Course Credits

Developer

Scott Henderson, with MU High School

Instructional Editor

Elton Boone

Copyeditor

Denise Vultee

Multimedia

James Barnes

Image and Multimedia Attributions

Title Graphic

The map used in the title graphic is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

 

Lesson 1: Commerce, Conquest, and Colonization (1300–1600)

Amerigo Vespucci is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

sea monster is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

Mehmet II is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Eloquence. This image is in the public domain.

Prince Henry the Navigator is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

Isabella of Castille is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

Christopher Columbus is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

Hernán Cortés is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

 

Lesson 2: The Civilization of the Renaissance (1350–1550)

Mona Lisa is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Dbenbenn. This image is in the public domain.

The Louvre is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Wpgenar. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 License.

Petrarch is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

Lorenzo de' Medici is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

Michelangelo Buonarroti is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

Michelangelo's David is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Hellisp. This file is licensed under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2.

Michelangelo's The Last Judgment is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Hellisp. This file is in the public domain.

Leonardo da Vinci is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

Da Vinci's The Last Supper is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Thebrid. This file is in the public domain.

Da Vinci's Vitruvian Man is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Luc Viatour. This file is in the public domain.

Desiderius Erasmus is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

Raphael's School of Athens is courtesy of the Web Gallery of Art. This file is in the public domain.

Dürer's The Four Holy Men is courtesy of the Web Gallery of Art. This file is in the public domain.

Donatello's David is courtesy of the Web Gallery of Art. This file is in the public domain.

Masaccio's Trinity is courtesy of the Web Gallery of Art. This file is in the public domain.

Raphael's Self-Portrait is courtesy of the Web Gallery of Art. This file is in the public domain.

Michelangelo's Creation of Adam is courtesy of the Web Gallery of Art. This file is in the public domain.

Botticelli's Adoration of the Magi is courtesy of the Web Gallery of Art. This file is in the public domain.

Da Vinci's Lady with an Ermine is courtesy of the Web Gallery of Art. This file is in the public domain.

Botticelli's Birth of Venus is courtesy of the Web Gallery of Art. This file is in the public domain.

Masaccio's Saint Peter Healing the Sick with His Shadow is courtesy of the Web Gallery of Art. This file is in the public domain.

Holbein's Erasmus is courtesy of the Web Gallery of Art. This file is in the public domain.

Dürer's Saint Jerome in His Study is courtesy of the Web Gallery of Art. This file is in the public domain.

Michelangelo's The Last Judgment is courtesy of the Web Gallery of Art. This file is in the public domain.

Donatello's Gattamelata is courtesy of the Web Gallery of Art. This file is in the public domain.

Holbein's Sir Thomas More is courtesy of the Web Gallery of Art. This file is in the public domain.

Da Vinci's Madonna on the Rocks is courtesy of the Web Gallery of Art. This file is in the public domain.

 

Lesson 3: Reformations of Religion

Martin Luther is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

The Diet of Worms engraving is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

John Calvin is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

John Calvin and Geneva's Consistory is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

John Knox is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

Ulrich Zwingli is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

Zwingli's meeting in Zurich is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

Henry VIII is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

Catherine of Aragon is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

Anne Boleyn is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

Jane Seymour is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

Anne of Cleves is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

Catherine Howard is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

Catherine Parr is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

 

Lesson 4: Religious Wars and State Buliding (1540–1660)

The copy of the The Fourth Crusade engraving is in the public domain.

Thomas Hobbes is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

Bernini's Ecstasy of St. Teresa is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Jastrow. This file is in the public domain.

Charles V is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

Henry IV is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

Franois Dubois's An Eyewitness Account of the Saint Bartholomew's Day Massacre is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Gryffindor. This file is in the public domain.

Philip II is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

The Escorial palace photo is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Xauxa. This file is licensed under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version.

Oliver Cromwell is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

The Battle of Naseby Memorial photo is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Gene.arboit. This file is licensed under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version.

Cardinal Richelieu is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Ascánder. This file is in the public domain

Cardinal Richelieu at the Siege of La Rochelle is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Ascánder. This file is in the public domain.

 

Lesson 5: The Economy and Society of Early Modern Europe

Charles II is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

 

Lesson 6: The Age of Absolutism (1660–1789)

The photo of the Augustus statue is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Saperaud. This file is licensed under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version.

King John signs the Magna Carta is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Picture Master. This file is in the public domain.

John Locke is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

Frederick the Great of Prussia is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Maksim. This file is in the public domain.

Louis XIV is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Itsmine. This file is in the public domain.

Peter I is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Anathema. This file is in the public domain.

Catherine II of Russia is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Mathiasrex. This file is in the public domain.

Maria Theresa is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Searobin. This file is in the public domain.

 

Lesson 7: The Scientific Revolution

Nicolaus Copernicus is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

Raphael's School of Athens is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Jic. This file is in the public domain.

Archimedes is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

Jan Matejko's Conversation with God is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of EugeneZelenko. This file is in the public domain.

Galileo is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Quadell. This file is in the public domain.

Galileo's experiment is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

Francis Bacon is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

René Descartes is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Dedden. This file is in the public domain.

Isaac Newton is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Zaphod. This file is in the public domain.

Newton passes sunlight through a prism is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

 

Lesson 8: The Enlightenment

Voltaire is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

Voltaire en 1718 is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Maarten van Vliet. This file is in the public domain.

Rousseau is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Maarten van Vliet. This file is in the public domain.

Montesquieu is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of ArtMechanic. This file is in the public domian.

Louis XV is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of BetacommandBot. This file is in the public domain.

John Locke is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

 

Lesson 9: The French Revolution

Jacques Necker is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Justelipse. This file is in the public domain.

The Storming of Bastille painting is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Dodo. This file is in the public domain.

Louis XVI is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Joseph45. This file is in the public domian.

The Tennis Court Oath at Versailles is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Petrusbarbygere. This file is in the public domian.

Archduchess Marie Antoinette Habsburg-Lothringen (1755–93) at the spinnet is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Nico-dk. This file is in the public domian.

Maximilien Robespierre is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of ADGE. This file is in the public domian.

Horatio Nelson is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Akela3. This file is in the public domian.

The Battle of the Nile, August 1st 1798 at 10pm painting is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Duesentrieb. This file is in the public domian.

Napoleon Bonaparte is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Jan Arkesteijn. This file is in the public domian.

Napoleon on His Imperial Throne is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Gdr. This file is in the public domian.

Mort de Napoléon Ier à Sainte-Hélène, le 5 mai 1821 is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Frank Schulenburg. This file is in the public domian.

 

Lesson 10: The Industrial Revolution

The photo of Hadrian's Wall is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Jamesflomonosoff. This file is in the public domain.

James Watt is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Bwwm. This file is in the public domain.

Watt's steam engine is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

The spinning jenny is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

The spinning mule is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

The steam engine is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Tagishsimon. This file is in the public domain.

The cotton gin is courtesy of the Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division (LC-USF34-T01-000449-D)

The water frame is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

The flying shuttle is © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation.

London, Houses of Parliament. The Sun Shining through the Fog (1904), by Claude Monet, is from Wikimedia Commons courtesy of the Bequest of Comte Isaac de Camondo. This file is in the public domain.

Rights holders of any materials not credited on this page should contact Mizzou Academy Online.

Every effort has been made to contact the copyright holders. Rights holders of any materials not credited on this page should contact Mizzou Academy Online.

Mizzou Academy Policies Policies

Academic Integrity

Our academic integrity policy at Mizzou Academy is based on our values of ethical behavior, learning, and giving all stakeholders the benefit of the doubt. Collaboration, research, and technical literacy are vital 21st-century skills when combined with academic integrity. 

Definitions

Mizzou Academy's academic integrity policy is aligned with the University of Missouri’s academic integrity policy. The definitions of what constitutes "cheating" and "plagiarism"are posted on the Provost’s Advising Council’s webpage which can be found here: https://advising.missouri.edu/policies/academic-integrity

Issues Involving Violations of Academic Integrity

If, when completing any of your assignments or exams for this course, you are found to have demonstrated cheating or plagiarism as defined above, this is a violation of academic integrity. At your teacher's discretion, violations of academic integrity may be subject to either or both of the following actions: 

  • receiving a zero for the assignment or exam
  • receiving an F for the course

Accessibility

If you anticipate barriers related to the format or requirements of this course, please let Mizzou Academy know as soon as possible. If disability-related accommodations are necessary (for example, a scribe, reader, extended time on exams, captioning), please contact Mizzou Academy.

About Exams at Mizzou Academy*

*This section describes the policies of exams at Mizzou Academy. This section only applies if you have exams in your course. See the section above to see if you have exams.

ABOUT EXAMS

Your exams are online. It is your responsibility to schedule your exams. 

During exams, unless otherwise noted, you are not allowed to navigate away from the exam or use any other resources. If you deviate from the exam guidelines without proper prior permission, it is considered cheating on an exam. 

SCHEDULING EXAMS

Global Courses

First, request approval for your proctor. Allow enough time (2 weeks) for our office to receive your request and communicate with your chosen exam site and proctor. Mizzou Academy has approved exam sites throughout the United States and around the world. 

Request Exam Date and Proctor Approval Form

  • Choose a proctor and make arrangements for taking the exam.
  • At least 2 weeks prior to taking your exam, submit your proctor information to Mizzou Academy 
  • You will be sent an email notice indicating if your chosen proctor has been approved or denied.
  • Arrive at your proctor’s testing site at the scheduled time with a photo ID. At testing time, you will log into your Mizzou Academy account and select the exam for your proctor to access and administer.

You can also schedule with an online proctor using Examity. Review the information in the "Getting Started Resources (Canvas and Other Resources)" section under the "Examity" panel. in the course syllabus.

Co-Teach Courses

If you are taking a co-teach course, work with your local teacher to identify your date of the exam and how you will be proctored. You do not need to request an exam date with the above form.

HOW TO PREPARE FOR EXAMS

  • Complete and review all assignments.
  • Review the learning objectives; make sure you can accomplish them.
  • Be prepared to explain any key terms and concepts.
  • Review all the lessons, exercises, and study questions.
  • Review any feedback and/or comments on your assignments and previous exams; look up answers to any questions you missed.

Additional Course Policies and links

**Not applicable to World Language courses.

Getting Started Resources (Canvas and Other Resources)

View the content below to learn more about each of these elements and how they work in your Mizzou Academy Canvas course.

Canvas Overview

Mobile Apps

If you are on a mobile device, download the Canvas mobile apps. With the apps, you can access all your courses using the Canvas mobile app, "Canvas By Instructure." Go to Google Play to download the Android version and iTunes to download the iOS version. 

View the mobile features by device

iOS

Download Canvas by Instructure on iTunes

Android

Download Canvas by Instructure on Google Play

Browser Requirements

Library, Writing, and Research Resources

Library Resources

Below are several useful library links. Click the images to go directly to the websites.

Purdue Online Writing Lab (OWL)

EBSCOhostHeritageQuestEBSCOhost

Assignments

Assignment Formatting

You might choose to download Mizzou Academy's assignment templates (docx):

Download MLA

Download APA

You may use whichever style unless specifically requested by your instructor.

How to Submit Assignments

How to submit assignments requiring multiple file types - link to Canvas Guides documentation

 How to submit assignments requiring multiple file types - link to video

 

Additional Canvas Guide documentation

The following Canvas Guide explains the different methods of submitting assignments in Canvas. Note that not all assignments will have these options available. Contact your teacher using Canvas Conversations if you have any questions. When you create a message in Canvas Conversations, select "Teachers" in the dropdown list in the "To" field.

How to submit assignments - link to Canvas Guides documentation

 

View Canvas Overview Videos

In this video, you will learn more about assignments: what they are and how to submit them through Canvas.

For more on uploading and viewing assignments, visit Assignments in the Canvas Student Guide.

~~How to Print Files to PDF

View Print to PDF for instructions on how to print a file to PDF. 

If you are submitting a file from your Google Drive account, download the file as a .PDF or .DOC and  then submit the .PDF or .DOC version in Canvas. View How to download Google doc file (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. for information on how to download a Google Doc file.

~~Turnitin

Turnitin is a plagiarism detection service that is integrated with Canvas. It allows instructors and students to view an Originality Report of written work or other homework assignments. The system is designed to facilitate feedback between instructors and students on written work.

The University of Missouri has a license agreement with Turnitin.com, a service that helps detect plagiarism by comparing student papers with Turnitin's database and Internet sources. Students who take this course agree that all required papers may be submitted to Turnitin.com.

Students who submit papers to Turnitin retain the copyright to the work they created. A copy of submitted papers is retained in a Turnitin database archive to be compared with future submissions—a practice that helps protect and strengthen copyright ownership. Use of the Turnitin service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on Turnitin's website at https://guides.turnitin.com/Privacy_and_Security#Terms_of_Service.

Mizzou Academy uses Turnitin, which provides tools for assignments. One of these tools is the "originality check." Note that it is not called a "plagiarism detector." That is because ONLY an instructor can determine plagiarism. 

For example, it could be that you get a 100% match (in red) on your submission. However, perhaps you are working in a group or your instructor had you submit something multiple times to different assignments within the same course. Or perhaps your class is filling out a worksheet, so all of the worksheet components would be "not original" but your content would be. 

If you are concerned about any results that you are confused about, feel free to discuss this with your teacher. 

How to Submit a Turnitin Assignment in Canvas 

There is no difference on how to submit an assignment with or without Turnitin enabled. Review the "Assignments" panel above for more information on how to submit assignments or click the link below:

How to submit assignments - link to Canvas Guides documentation

Citing Sources

Citing Sources Interactive Module

The Citing Sources Interactive Tutorial to help you with learning how to cite your sources as well as inform you about what plagiarism is, what it isn't, and how to avoid it. 

View the Citing Sources tutorial

See the OWL Resource Website for additional help in citing sources and avoiding plagiarism. 

How to Record and Submit Audio and Video

Recording and Submitting

There are many ways you can submit audio and video recordings for a Mizzou Academy course in Canvas. Your course content may refer to Audacity.  (Links to an external site.)However, you don't need to use Audacity to make an mp3 recording for your course. After all, there are many programs and apps on computers and mobile devices that will do just that! 

View How Can I Submit My Audio and Video Recordings for more information on how to submit media files.

Note: You can also submit assignments using files stored on third-party apps (e.g. Dropbox) on your mobile apps.

View the following Canvas Guides for additional information on how to record and submit audio and video files

We do NOT allow you to submit .wav files. 

 

 

How to Shoot Quality Audio and Video

The only way for you to present quality speeches (and other multimedia) to your Mizzou teacher is by uploading a video of yourself. Therefore, it's incredibly important that the audio and video quality is good enough that your instructor can see and hear everything clearly.  You might all be in different environments using various types of cameras, so rather than attempting to teach you about specific cameras, we're going to concentrate on things like lighting, background, setup and stabilization, and audio. 

Lighting and Background

  • Use a distraction-free background
  • Face windows with natural light
  • Avoid overhead lights when indoors
  • Use a lamp or two for additional lighting
  • Watch back your video to see how it looks
  • Keep trying, keep learning, and keep having fun

Setup and Stabilization

  • Don't shoot handheld
  • Use anything that can safely hold the camera steady
    • tripod and mount
    • DIY solutions (picture stand, bean bag, binder clips)
  • Place the camera level with your eyeline

Audio

  • Shoot video in the quietest room at the quietest time of day
  • Turn everything off (cell phone, TV, radio, fans, etc.)
  • Get closer to the camera
  • Avoid noisy habits (hand rubbing, clapping, etc.)
  • Use an external microphone
 

Setting Up Your YouTube (Or Other Video) Account

 
If you already have a Gmail account, then you have a YouTube account, but in case you don't, getting your account set up is the first step. Just go to gmail.com and create an account to get started. Work with a trusted adult or parent. 
 
Creator Studio
On thing to note is that you can access all of your channel's videos and privacy settings through the Creator Studio. To locate this area in your account, click the icon in the upper right corner (where you logged in) and you should see the option for Creator Studio under your login name. Once you click this, you will be taken to the dashboard area for your account.  There are a few different areas available you should be aware of: 
 
Video Manager
This section houses all of the videos on your account. You can also create playlists (lists or groups of videos with a similar topic or theme). 
 
Channel
Your content settings are located with the majority of your video and content settings. It is also where you can determine the privacy of your videos. If you click on Upload Defaults in this section, it will give you the options that you can set for all future uploads. Changing the privacy to Unlisted means that anyone with the link will be able to view your video but it won't be searchable to the public. 
 
Create
This section isn't required, but it's good to be aware that this area provides a basic video editor where you can make minor adjustments to your videos as well as add copyright free background music. 
 

Uploading a Video

Now that your account is setup, you are ready to upload your video. Here are the steps you will need to follow:
  • Click Upload in the upper right-hand corner of the screen
  • Either drag & drop the video file into the box or click on the gray arrow to select it from your files. You will notice that the privacy box will already be set to unlisted based on your privacy settings
  • This will automatically begin the upload once the file is selected, taking you to a new window:
    • Make sure the title box is correctly filled out
    • Descriptions and tags are usually left blank unless the video is public
    • Thumbnails This is what viewers will see when they first pull up your video. You can choose from a few automatic image selections, or you can upload your image
  • Once the video finishes uploading, processing, and you selected the titles/thumbnails, click "Done
  • The link to share your video will appear. Copy and paste this link to turn in your video. 

Getting Your Videos Into the Course: Uploading

If you are comfortable with recording video, transferring the file to your computer, and then uploading, this is the preferred method because some assignments (such as video journals) will have you recording multiple videos for one assignment. One problem you may run into is a camera that creates an incredibly large file. In such cases, you may need to convert the file to make it smaller.

File Conversion

Some cameras record videos that create very large file sizes. Depending on your internet connection, these larger files might have problems uploading. In these cases, you might need to convert the video to a smaller version. Look for a free video converter like Any Video Converter or Format Factory to help you. 

Getting Your Videos Into the Course: Direct Recording

Canvas does allow you to record via webcam directly into Canvas.  However, this will not be available when multiple videos are required. Another reason to shy away from this method is that if you have a hiccup in your internet connection or your computer freezes, your video will be lost, and you will have to rerecord everything. Just to save the hassle, it's better to either upload a file or provide a link to an unpublished YouTube video.

Quizzes and Exams

 In this video, we'll show you how to take a quiz/exam in Canvas.

For more on taking quizzes and exams, visit Quizzes in the Canvas Student Guide.

NOTE:  Read your Syllabus and the Quiz and Exam instructions for your course so that you are aware of the policies and how a quiz and exam is setup.  The Quizzes link may not be in the course navigation menu in your course and only accessible by clicking on Modules and clicking on the pertinent lesson. 

~~Suggestions for Taking Objective Examinations

What is an "objective examination?" Objective means that there IS a right answer (or answers), and you either get things right or wrong. An example is a multiple-choice quiz or exam. This section is here to provide you with tips on how to take objective examinations, or "exams."

Many people worry about how to do well when taking objective examinations.  What does What follows are some simple suggestions that should help you to do your best.

What do you do when you know the answer?  Silly question, right?  You mark it!

What do you do when you don’t know the answer?  This is what you want to hear!

  1. First, you need to remember that our quizzes and exams are based on the number of right answers out of the total possible.  So you should answer every question, even if it’s a guess.  There are four answer choices, so your odds when you guess are 1 in 4.  That is, on average, you should get 1 out of every 4 guesses correct.
  2. How do you narrow the odds, to make them more in your favor? If you are able to eliminate one or more of the answers as definitely wrong, you have done just that.  When you are guessing which answer is correct out of 3, then you could get one-third of your guesses correct.  When you are guessing between two, you could get half of them right.
  3. What if you see an answer choice that you absolutely have never seen before? There is a very good chance it is a wrong answer, and you can eliminate it.  Remember, you’ve read over and studied the material.  Most of the time you will know if something doesn’t belong.
  4. Does the answer make sense? A correct answer always makes sense.  Incorrect choices may, or may not.  So if a choice does not make sense in relation to the question, it is probably a wrong answer.
  5. Do not spend a lot of time on a question that is giving you trouble. Move on, and come back to it later.  Many times, you will find something in a later question or answer choice that helps you to select the answer to a question you skipped over.  This is known as making the test work FOR YOU.
  6. Above all, relax! You have been over the material.  It is all in your head.  Just take a deep breath and go at it.  YOU CAN DO IT!

Many students develop their own tricks to help themselves on objective tests.  What you see above can assist you.  But you may also rely on whatever works for you.

~~Suggestions for Taking Essay Exams

What!? I’m going to have to write!?

It is not unusual for people to be nervous about taking an essay exam.  You will have to decide what the question means, search through the memory banks of your brain, recall information that relates to the question, and then write something that is well organized and clear.  What follows are some tips that just might make this process a little less scary.

Let’s start with an essay question.

An essay question may be fairly short, perhaps only one paragraph.  They may also be longer, requiring several paragraphs to answer.  No matter how short, or long, the essay needs to be, the process is the same.  As an example, we’ll use a topic that is “medium.”

The framers of the Constitution of the United States established the Electoral College system, which provides an indirect method of electing the President.  This system should be changed to permit the direct election of the President, so the candidate who receives the greatest number of the popular vote to win election.  Agree or disagree.

Great!  Now what?

This may seem pretty long.  But you need to remember that you do not have to deal with everything in the statement.  The first thing you need to do is identify what you have to answer, and what you can ignore.  The question statement is reproduced below, with the parts you have to consider highlighted.

The framers of the Constitution of the United States established the Electoral College system, which provides an indirect method of electing the President.  This system should be changed to permit the direct election of the President, so the candidate who receives the greatest number of the popular vote to win the election.  Agree or disagree.

While everything else in the question is relevant to the topic, you are being asked to support the Electoral College system (indirect election) or the popular vote (direct election).

Next?

Write down a brief outline of what you need to do.  It would be best if you did this in order.

  • Introduction: State your position.  Do you agree or disagree. Give a preview of why you have chosen your position.
  • Body Paragraph: Explain your first reason for your position.  You might also want to state why the method you did NOT choose falls short.
  • Body Paragraph: Explain your second reason for your position.  Again, you could state why the method you did NOT choose falls short.
  • Body Paragraph: Explain your third reason, if you have one, along with why the method you did NOT choose falls short.
  • Conclusion: Restate your reasons for your position.  This is when you drive your arguments home.

What are we saying here?

There is a very simple way to look at essay writing.  No matter if the essay is one paragraph, or five, or ten.  You do the same three things. 

  1. Tell the readers what you are going to tell them (introduction).
  2. Tell them (body).
  3. Tell the readers what you told them (conclusion).

And in conclusion….

This process can be very helpful.  You need to remember:  you are probably not going to be expected to respond to every word in the essay topic.  That’s why it’s important to identify what you need to consider.  While essays from different classes will look different, the approach to them is pretty much the same.  You can even practice this skill on your own, creating topics on things with which you are familiar.  The more you practice, the easier it becomes.

Good luck!

~~Examity

About Examity

One of the options that is now available to you is to use Examity (Links to an external site.), a 100% online proctoring service. This means that instead of finding someone in-person that can proctor your test, you can instead choose Examity.

Examity does charge a fee. The Examity link located at the end of the Online Proctoring Resources module allows you to be automatically logged in to schedule your exam and pay for proctoring. If you scheduled to have your test proctored with Examity, you will also use that link to log in to Examity to begin your exam.

Next, you will need to read the detailed directions and requirements before using Examity. Examity use is not mandatory; it is only an option.

Read More Details About Examity and How To Use 

Calendar

The calendar video introduces you to the Canvas Calendar and shows you how you can stay organized by scheduling your own events.

Netiquette

Netiquette—short for "network etiquette" or "Internet etiquette"—is a set of guidelines for how to communicate appropriately on the web. As a Mizzou Academy student, you will be expected to follow these guidelines in your interactions with your instructor and fellow students.

  • Be respectful. Online, as in life, the Golden Rule applies: Treat others as you would like to be treated. There are effective ways to disagree with someone without being insulting. Keep in mind that sarcasm can sometimes be misinterpreted.
  • Use appropriate language. Avoid foul language and rude or vulgar comments.
  • Use proper grammar and spelling. Typos and spelling mistakes are bound to happen, but excessive errors are distracting. Use a browser with a built-in spell checker if you need help!
  • Respect others' privacy. Do not quote or forward personal messages or information without the original author's permission.
  • Avoid plagiarism. It is never acceptable to copy and paste the work of others and call it your own. Be sure to cite your sources correctly.

For more about appropriate online behavior, view Show Me Respect: Tips for Thwarting Cyberbullying, Cyber-Harassment, and Cyberstalking from the University of Missouri's Equity Office.

How to Scan and Upload Your Work

Click on How to Scan and Upload Your Work to download a Word document of this tutorial.

 

Canvas and Technical Support

Canvas is where course content, grades, and communication will reside for this course.

Course Summary:

Date Details