Course Syllabus

Syllabus Speech: Introduction to Public Speaking

University of Missouri High School

ELA-1002A GL | 1/2 Unit Language Arts | Global Course
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Welcome

We are pleased that you selected this course to fulfill your unique educational needs. You are now a member of the Mizzou Academy's global student body.

Although the freedom to choose when and where to study is a privilege, it is also a responsibility that requires motivation and self-discipline. To succeed at learning, you will need to develop a study plan by setting realistic goals and working toward them. 

This global course is designed through the individual sections to assist in your pacing. 

Course Overview

Today, many students, parents, and school administrators are realizing that communication skills are a vital part of a successful education. This course will help you learn how to become a better all-around communicator. You will learn how context plays a role in communication and about the different levels of communication. You will also examine some of the reasons why being an effective communicator is so important.

You will learn some communication skills to help you survive not only in the workplace, but in college, in relationships, and in most other areas of your life. The goal is that, when you finish this course, you will have the communication tools to help you to be successful in getting the job you want, and when your boss says, “You have a presentation worth five thousand dollars that is due on Friday, good luck,” you will be able to handle the task and get the account.

Course Description

In this course, students will gain core speech competencies by learning about and applying key public speaking knowledge and skills. Students will analyze professional and peer speeches by applying what they learn about aspects of verbal and nonverbal communication skills such as paralanguage, body language and proxemics, proxemics, and types of listening. Students will also learn about barriers to clear communication and focus on elements which enhance clear communication in public speaking. 

Students gain experience in public speaking by starting small: video journaling and introducing themselves, culminating in a Mizzou Academy global student body presidential candidate speech. 

Students will gain confidence in their ability to deliver speeches both publicly and online. Come join the fun!

Course Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  1. Analyze verbal and nonverbal communication in your own and others' speeches that enhance or hinder clear communication
  2. Effectively deliver informative, extemporaneous, demonstrative, and persuasive speeches to small and global audiences
  3. Employ the process of preparing, outlining, writing, delivering, recording, reviewing, and gathering feedback in order to improve your own speech performance through practice and refinement

Required Materials

No textbook required.

1 journal notebook with pen or pencil. (You will use this to write down ideas and thoughts for your speeches.)

Pacing- Global

Although the freedom to choose when and where to study is a privilege, it is also a responsibility that requires motivation and self-discipline. To succeed at learning, you will need to develop a study plan by setting realistic goals and working toward them. 

Our courses are designed to assist in your pacing. Below are Pacing Schedules: 

16-Week (~4 Month) Pacing 26-Week (6 Month) Pacing
Week Module
1 Course Introduction and Resources
2 Lesson 1
3 Lesson 2
4 Lesson 3
5 Lesson 4
6 Lesson 5
7 Lesson 6
8 Midterm Exam
9 Lesson 7
10 Lesson 8
11 Lesson 9
12 Lesson 10
13 Lesson 11
14 Lesson 12
15 Study Week / Catch-Up Week
15-16 Final Exam (Recommended early; Don't wait last minute!)
Week Module
1 Course Introduction and Resources
2-3 Lesson 1
4 Lesson 2
5-6 Lesson 3
7 Lesson 4
8-9 Lesson 5
10 Lesson 6
11-12 Midterm Exam
13 Lesson 7
14-15 Lesson 8
16 Lesson 9
17-18 Lesson 10
19 Lesson 11
20-21 Lesson 12
22-23 Study Week / Catch-Up Week
22-26 Final Exam (Recommended early; Don't wait last minute!)

Technical Requirements

The most up-to-date requirements can be found here: 

Additional requirements for the course are below: 

  • Webcam (must be good enough quality that can capture facial expressions at 6 feet away)
  • External microphone (must be good enough quality that can capture clear audio)
  • A quiet place to record your speech.
  • Timer or watch to keep track of speech time

Canvas and Technical Support

Canvas is the where course content, grades, and communication will reside for this course.

Quizzes & Assignments

You should submit all assigned work in sequence (Lesson 1, then Lesson 2, etc.) Assignments for the course are listed at the bottom of this syllabus.

Quizzes

Quizzes are taken online. After you submit them, you’ll quickly receive a report on how you did. Unlike exams, you may use any assigned readings, your notes, and other course-related materials to complete graded quizzes and assignments. 

Assignments

Assignments may require you to submit your completed work in the form of a file (such as a text document, image, audio or video recording, or multimedia presentation) or a hyperlink for grading. 

Practice

There are PRACTICES throughout the course.  These activities are ungraded and can be submitted multiple times.

Reading and Using Feedback

After your work has been graded, you will receive a report that provides individualized feedback and comments on your work. Look carefully at what you missed and read any corresponding feedback. Then study the lesson materials to make certain that you can accomplish the associated learning objectives.

Each lesson provides step-by-step instructions on how to submit your work. Be sure to check submitted work carefully for errors (e.g. spelling, grammar, and punctuation) as they may result in points being deducted.

Exams

You are required to take proctored exams for this course.

See the "About Exams" in the policies section for additional information on exams with Mizzou Academy.

Grades

Your final grade will be based on the number of points you earn on assignments and exams.

Points Distribution
Source Available Points
Assignments 246
Quizzes 246
Midterm Exam 63
Final Exam 133
Total 688

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Grading Scale
Grade Percentage
A 90–100
B 80–89
C 70–79
D 60–69
F 0–59

After completing the course, you will receive a grade report that gives your percentage and your letter grade for the course.

Getting Started Resources (Canvas and Other Resources)

View the content below to learn more about each of these elements and how they work in your Mizzou Academy Canvas course.

Canvas Overview

Mobile Apps

If you are on a mobile device, download the Canvas mobile apps. With the apps, you can access all your courses using Canvas' mobile app, "Canvas By Instructure." Go to Google Play to download the Android version and iTunes to download the iOS version. 

View the mobile features by device

iOS

Download Canvas by Instructure on iTunes

Android

Download Canvas by Instructure on Google Play

Browser Requirements

Assignments

View Canvas overview videos:

In this video, you will learn more about assignments: what they are and how to submit them through Canvas.

Click to download a transcript of this video.

For more on uploading and viewing assignments, visit Assignments in the Canvas Student Guide.

~~Turnitin

Turnitin Originality Check Report

Mizzou Academy uses Turnitin, which provides tools for assignments. One of these tools is the "originality check." Note that it is not called a "plagiarism detector." That is because ONLY an instructor can determine plagiarism. 

For example, it could be that you get a 100% match (in red) on your submission. However, perhaps you are working in a group or your instructor had you submit something multiple times to different assignments within the same course. Or perhaps your class is filling out a worksheet, so all of the worksheet components would be "not original" but your content would be. 

If you are concerned about any results that you are confused about, feel free to discuss this with your teacher. 

Watch the video below which shows you how to use your Originality check tool. We hope you use this as a learning tool. 

University of Missouri has a license agreement with Turnitin.com, a service that helps detect plagiarism by comparing student papers with Turnitin's database and Internet sources. Students who take this course agree that all required papers may be submitted to Turnitin.com.

Students who submit papers to Turnitin retain the copyright to the work they created. A copy of submitted papers is retained in a Turnitin database archive to be compared with future submissions—a practice that helps protect and strengthen copyright ownership. Use of the Turnitin service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on Turnitin's website at http://turnitin.com/en_us/about-us/privacy/legal-faqs.

~~Citing Sources

Citing Sources Interactive Module

The Citing Sources Interactive Tutorial to help you with learning how to cite your sources as well as inform you about what plagiarism is, what it isn't, and how to avoid it. 

View the Citing Sources tutorial

See the OWL Resource Website for additional help in citing sources and avoiding plagiarism. 

~~Writing and Research Resources

Library Resources

Below are several useful library links. Click the images to go directly to the websites.

username: muhigh password: student

Britannica SchooliNet Library

Other Writing Resources

Purdue Online Writing Lab (OWL)

Other Library Resources

The following are online resources that you may find helpful for your courses.

EBSCOhostHeritageQuestEBSCOhost

~~How to Record and Submit Audio and Video

Recording and Submitting

There are many ways you can submit audio and video recordings for a Mizzou K–12 course in Canvas. Your course content may refer to Audacity.  (Links to an external site.)However, you don't need to use Audacity to make an mp3 recording for your course. After all, there are many programs and apps on computers and mobile devices that will do just that! 

Note: You can also submit assignments using files stored on third-party apps (e.g. Dropbox) on your mobile apps.

 

We do NOT allow you to submit .wav files. 

 

 

Quizzes

 

In this video, we'll show you how to take a quiz in Canvas and then review your answers.

Click to download a transcript of this video.

For more on taking quizzes, visit Quizzes in the Canvas Student Guide (the quizzes link may not be in the course navigation menu in your course and only accessible by clicking on Modules and clicking on the pertinent lesson).

Exams

In this video, we'll go over the key differences between a quiz and an exam and show you how to take an exam in Canvas.

Click to download a transcript of this video.

For more on taking quizzes, visit Quizzes in the Canvas Student Guide (the quizzes link may not be in the course navigation menu in your course and only accessible by clicking on Modules and clicking on the pertinent lesson).

~~Suggestions for Taking Objective Examinations

What is an "objective examination?" Objective means that there IS a right answer (or answers), and you either get things right or wrong. An example is a multiple-choice quiz or exam. This section is here to provide you with tips on how to take objective examinations, or "exams."

Many people worry about how to do well when taking objective examinations.  What does What follows are some simple suggestions that should help you to do your best.

What do you do when you know the answer?  Silly question, right?  You mark it!

What do you do when you don’t know the answer?  This is what you want to hear!

  1. First, you need to remember that our quizzes and exams are based on the number of right answers out of the total possible.  So you should answer every question, even if it’s a guess.  There are four answer choices, so your odds when you guess are 1 in 4.  That is, on average, you should get 1 out of every 4 guesses correct.
  2. How do you narrow the odds, to make them more in your favor? If you are able to eliminate one or more of the answers as definitely wrong, you have done just that.  When you are guessing which answer is correct out of 3, then you could get one-third of your guesses correct.  When you are guessing between two, you could get half of them right.
  3. What if you see an answer choice that you absolutely have never seen before? There is a very good chance it is a wrong answer, and you can eliminate it.  Remember, you’ve read over and studied the material.  Most of the time you will know if something doesn’t belong.
  4. Does the answer make sense? A correct answer always makes sense.  Incorrect choices may, or may not.  So if a choice does not make sense in relation to the question, it is probably a wrong answer.
  5. Do not spend a lot of time on a question that is giving you trouble. Move on, and come back to it later.  Many times, you will find something in a later question or answer choice that helps you to select the answer to a question you skipped over.  This is known as making the test work FOR YOU.
  6. Above all, relax! You have been over the material.  It is all in your head.  Just take a deep breath and go at it.  YOU CAN DO IT!

Many students develop their own tricks to help themselves on objective tests.  What you see above can assist you.  But you may also rely on whatever works for you.

~~Suggestions for Taking Essay Exams

What!? I’m going to have to write!?

It is not unusual for people to be nervous about taking an essay exam.  You will have to decide what the question means, search through the memory banks of your brain, recall information that relates to the question, and then write something that is well organized and clear.  What follows are some tips that just might make this process a little less scary.

Let’s start with an essay question.

An essay question may be fairly short, perhaps only one paragraph.  They may also be longer, requiring several paragraphs to answer.  No matter how short, or long, the essay needs to be, the process is the same.  As an example, we’ll use a topic that is “medium.”

The framers of the Constitution of the United States established the Electoral College system, which provides an indirect method of electing the President.  This system should be changed to permit the direct election of the President, so the candidate who receives the greatest number of the popular vote to win election.  Agree or disagree.

Great!  Now what?

This may seem pretty long.  But you need to remember that you do not have to deal with everything in the statement.  The first thing you need to do is identify what you have to answer, and what you can ignore.  The question statement is reproduced below, with the parts you have to consider highlighted.

The framers of the Constitution of the United States established the Electoral College system, which provides an indirect method of electing the President.  This system should be changed to permit the direct election of the President, so the candidate who receives the greatest number of the popular vote to win the election.  Agree or disagree.

While everything else in the question is relevant to the topic, you are being asked to support the Electoral College system (indirect election) or the popular vote (direct election).

Next?

Write down a brief outline of what you need to do.  It would be best if you did this in order.

  • Introduction: State your position.  Do you agree or disagree. Give a preview of why you have chosen your position.
  • Body Paragraph: Explain your first reason for your position.  You might also want to state why the method you did NOT choose falls short.
  • Body Paragraph: Explain your second reason for your position.  Again, you could state why the method you did NOT choose falls short.
  • Body Paragraph: Explain your third reason, if you have one, along with why the method you did NOT choose falls short.
  • Conclusion: Restate your reasons for your position.  This is when you drive your arguments home.

What are we saying here?

There is a very simple way to look at essay writing.  No matter if the essay is one paragraph, or five, or ten.  You do the same three things. 

  1. Tell the readers what you are going to tell them (introduction).
  2. Tell them (body).
  3. Tell the readers what you told them (conclusion).

And in conclusion….

This process can be very helpful.  You need to remember:  you are probably not going to be expected to respond to every word in the essay topic.  That’s why it’s important to identify what you need to consider.  While essays from different classes will look different, the approach to them is pretty much the same.  You can even practice this skill on your own, creating topics on things with which you are familiar.  The more you practice, the easier it becomes.

Good luck!

Calendar

The calendar video introduces you to the Canvas Calendar and shows you how you can stay organized by scheduling your own events.

Netiquette

Netiquette—short for "network etiquette" or "Internet etiquette"—is a set of guidelines for how to communicate appropriately on the web. As a Mizzou K–12 Online student, you will be expected to follow these guidelines in your interactions with your instructor and fellow students.

  • Be respectful. Online, as in life, the Golden Rule applies: Treat others as you would like to be treated. There are effective ways to disagree with someone without being insulting. Keep in mind that sarcasm can sometimes be misinterpreted.
  • Use appropriate language. Avoid foul language and rude or vulgar comments.
  • Use proper grammar and spelling. Typos and spelling mistakes are bound to happen, but excessive errors are distracting. Use a browser with a built-in spell checker if you need help!
  • Respect others' privacy. Do not quote or forward personal messages or information without the original author's permission.
  • Avoid plagiarism. It is never acceptable to copy and paste the work of others and call it your own. Be sure to cite your sources correctly.

For more about appropriate online behavior, view Show Me Respect: Tips for Thwarting Cyberbullying, Cyber-Harassment, and Cyberstalking from the University of Missouri's Equity Office.

Parent Registration and Student Observation

View how to create a parent account 

Note: DO NOT view student activity on your desktop. You may be asked to merge accounts with your student; instead, download the parent app.

Download Parent App

The Canvas Parent app is the mobile version of Canvas that helps parents stay up-to-date with their student's courses. Download the Canvas Parent app on Android and iOS devices.

Canvas Parent Android Guide

Canvas Parent iOS Guide

Mizzou Academy Policies Policies

Academic Integrity

Our academic integrity policy at Mizzou Academy is based on our values of ethical behavior, learning, and giving all stakeholders the benefit of the doubt. Collaboration, research, and technical literacy are vital 21st-century skills when combined with academic integrity. 

Definitions

Mizzou Academy's academic integrity policy is aligned with the University of Missouri’s academic integrity policy. The definitions of what constitutes "cheating" and "plagiarism"are posted on the Provost’s Advising Council’s webpage which can be found here: https://advising.missouri.edu/policies/academic-integrity

Issues Involving Violations of Academic Integrity

If, when completing any of your assignments or exams for this course, you are found to have demonstrated cheating or plagiarism as defined above, this is a violation of academic integrity. At your teacher's discretion, violations of academic integrity may be subject to either or both of the following actions: 

  • receiving a zero for the assignment or exam
  • receiving an F for the course

Accessibility

If you anticipate barriers related to the format or requirements of this course, please let Mizzou Academy know as soon as possible. If disability-related accommodations are necessary (for example, a scribe, reader, extended time on exams, captioning), please contact Mizzou Academy.

About Exams at Mizzou Academy*

*This section describes the policies of exams at Mizzou Academy. This section only applies if you have exams in your course. See the section above to see if you have exams.

ABOUT EXAMS

Your exams are online. It is your responsibility to schedule your exams. 

During exams, unless otherwise noted, you are not allowed to navigate away from the exam or use any other resources. If you deviate from the exam guidelines without proper prior permission, it is considered cheating on an exam. 

SCHEDULING EXAMS

Global Courses

First, request approval for your proctor. Allow enough time (2 weeks) for our office to receive your request and communicate with your chosen exam site and proctor. Mizzou Academy has approved exam sites throughout the United States and around the world. 

Request Exam Date and Proctor Approval Form

  • Choose a proctor and make arrangements for taking the exam.
  • At least 2 weeks prior to taking your exam, submit your proctor information to Mizzou Academy 
  • You will be sent an email notice indicating if your chosen proctor has been approved or denied.
  • Arrive at your proctor’s testing site at the scheduled time with a photo ID. At testing time, you will log into your Mizzou Academy account and select the exam for your proctor to access and administer.

You can also schedule with an online proctor using Examity. Review the information in the "Getting Started Resources (Canvas and Other Resources)" section under the "Examity" panel. in the course syllabus.

Co-Teach Courses

If you are taking a co-teach course, work with your local teacher to identify your date of the exam and how you will be proctored. You do not need to request an exam date with the above form.

HOW TO PREPARE FOR EXAMS

  • Complete and review all assignments.
  • Review the learning objectives; make sure you can accomplish them.
  • Be prepared to explain any key terms and concepts.
  • Review all the lessons, exercises, and study questions.
  • Review any feedback and/or comments on your assignments and previous exams; look up answers to any questions you missed.

Additional Course Policies and links

**Not applicable to World Language courses.

 

Course Summary:

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